Shutterbugs and Eagle Scout Ceremonies

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Photo by Gary Tamin from FreeImages

I recently had the chance to serve as “official photographer” at the 100th birthday party of a member of my church. Taking on a project like that is a fairly big responsibility–after all, you only turn 100 once!–so I was glad to see that other guests had cameras. One in particular–a son-in-law, I think–clearly had the equipment and expertise to do a credible job himself.

But I had one advantage over him and the selfie-shooters: I wasn’t a family member or close friend of the honoree (or of most of the guests, for that matter). While the other photographers were greeting old friends or helping coordinate the cutting of the cake, I was free to shoot, shoot, shoot. As a result, I got some nice photos that other people would have missed.

That experience only reconfirmed for me the importance of recruiting an official photographer for every Eagle Scout ceremony. As I explain in The Eagle Court of Honor Book, this person is uniquely positioned to capture the event for posterity.

To make his or her job easier, be sure to provide a list of “must have” photos, such as Mom pinning on the Eagle badge or the quartet singing “On My Honor.” If possible, have the photographer come to your rehearsal to get a better sense of the physical layout of the ceremony.

And one more tip: If a gaggle of photographers is taking a group photo, no one will know which camera to look at. For official posed photos, have someone stand behind the official photographer and say, “Look this way.”


NOW AVAILABLE: The fourth edition of The Eagle Court of Honor Book is now available from EagleBook.com and on Kindle! Updated to reflect the inclusion of girls in Scouts BSA, the book features gender-neutral ceremonies, a new Scouting segment called “Scouting for Girls,” and downloadable boys’ and girls’ versions of all ceremony materials. Print versions will be available soon from Amazon and ScoutStuff.org.

Mike Rowe’s Eagle Scout Letter

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I have a confession to make: I really don’t like the typical congratulatory letters many people read at Eagle courts of honor. The main reason: Most of them are so generic they could, with a few quick edits, be presented at Girl Scout Gold Award ceremonies, bar/bat mitzvahs, or high school graduations.

The exceptions are those letters that come from people who actually understand what it means to be an Eagle Scout–which often means they are Eagle Scouts themselves. And my favorite of these is the one TV personality Mike Rowe sends.

Or, more accurately, the one he used to send.

Several years ago, you could send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to Rowe’s office and receive in return a form letter with his actual signature attached. Given the volume of requests he was receiving (and probably the fact that many of us can’t easily put our hands on a postage stamp), he has now posted the letter on his website as a free download.

But what’s really important about the letter is not the signature at the bottom but the brutal honesty it contains. Put simply, Rowe wants new Eagle Scouts to get down off their pedestals and get to work. As he says near the end, “Fold up your sash and stow it away somewhere private, along with all the other tokens of what you’ve done so far. Then, roll up your sleeves, get out in the world, and put what you’ve learned to use.”

That’s a message many new Eagle Scouts need to hear, and I encourage you to help them hear it by presenting Rowe’s “completely transparent, totally honest Eagle Scout congratulatory form letter” to them.

(And while you’re downloading, consider also downloading my congratulatory letter to new Eagle Scouts. It’s a fillable PDF, so you can even personalize it!)


NOW AVAILABLE: The fourth edition of The Eagle Court of Honor Book is now available from EagleBook.com and on Kindle! Updated to reflect the inclusion of girls in Scouts BSA, the book features gender-neutral ceremonies, a new Scouting segment called “Scouting for Girls,” and downloadable boys’ and girls’ versions of all ceremony materials. Print versions will be available soon from Amazon and ScoutStuff.org.

Solving the Puzzle of Youth Leadership

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Photo by chadou99 from FreeImages

One of the puzzles most Scoutmasters and other adult troop leaders must solve is how much leeway to give their youth leaders in making decisions. Should you keep them on a short leash? Or should you give them enough rope to hang themselves?

Of course, the right answer is somewhere in between. But where exactly is the sweet spot?

Here’s a story that may help you decide.

My nearly two-year-old grandson likes to work jigsaw puzzles, especially if they have buses, planes, and cars on them. He’s not all that proficient, however. For example, rather than match puzzle pieces by picture, he tends to match them by shape, which means he often gets a piece upside down.

What I’ve started doing is to hand him two pieces that go together and let him solve that small challenge. I’ll also take one piece out of a 25-piece puzzle that’s already put together and let him figure out how that piece goes in. As he gets better, we’ll progress to more pieces until he’s able to work a whole puzzle. Of course, along the way, I’ll suggesting things like starting with the edge pieces or leaving the background for last.

You should do something similar with your youth leaders, especially if they’re new to leadership. Give them small challenges to tackle, guide them along the way, and then gradually increase the difficulty level. They’ll progress without becoming frustrated and–perhaps more importantly–you’ll learn what level of challenge they’re ready for.


NOW AVAILABLE: The fourth edition of The Eagle Court of Honor Book is now available from EagleBook.com and on Kindle! Updated to reflect the inclusion of girls in Scouts BSA, the book features gender-neutral ceremonies, a new Scouting segment called “Scouting for Girls,” and downloadable boys’ and girls’ versions of all ceremony materials. Print versions will be available soon from Amazon and ScoutStuff.org.