Just an Organization?

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In my volunteer life, I bounce back and forth between two worlds, Scouting and my church’s youth choir program, and I’m constantly amazed at the differences between the two. Scouting offers many things the church can’t match—an advancement program that gives Scouts a clear pathway, publications like Program Features for Troops and Crews that simplify planning, and the safety policies found in the Guide to Safe Scouting, which not only keep us all safe but save us the trouble of formulating our own rules through trial and error.

But in our strength there is weakness. In many corners of the program, Scouters seem more interested in the rules than the Scouts. We’ve all run into the uniform police, who are intent on pointing out every patch that’s sewn in the wrong spot. And then there are those advancement gurus who want to maintain the purity of the Eagle Scout badge by making the advancement process even harder than it already is.

This love of bureaucracy is something Scouting founder Robert Baden-Powell himself encountered. He was quoted as saying, “First I had an idea. Then I saw an ideal. Now we have a movement, and if some of you don’t watch out we shall end up with just an organization.”

Does your troop look more like an organization than a movement? If so, I hope you’ll give some thought to something else B-P said: “Scouting is not a science to be solemnly studied, nor is it a collection of doctrines and texts. Nor again is it a military code for drilling discipline into boys and repressing their individuality and initiative. No – it is a jolly game in the out of doors, where boy-men and boys can go adventuring together as older and younger brother, picking up health and happiness, handicraft and helpfulness.”

Add girls, sisters, and “girl-women” to that quote, and it’s as true today as it was when B-P said it. Or at least it should be.


Need more great troop program ideas? Check out The Scoutmaster’s Other Handbook, which is available in both print and e-book formats at https://www.eaglebook.com/products.htm#scoutmasters.

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BSA Makes Logo Use a Piece of Cake

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For many people, the centerpiece of an Eagle court of honor is not the ceremony–sorry, Mr. Long-winded Keynote Speaker!–but the reception that follows. And the centerpiece of the centerpiece is usually a delicious and nicely decorated cake with an Eagle Scout logo on top.

Getting that logo on a cake has become difficult over the years as bakeries across the country have become more familiar with trademark laws–in large part, I’m guessing, because licensed designs from Disney and Nickelodeon have become more popular. If a bakery uses a trademarked image like Mickey Mouse, Spider-Man or the Eagle Scout badge, it could potentially get in legal hot water.

For awhile, the BSA licensed its logos to a vendor that specialized in edible cake tops, but recently it has come up with a better solution: a simple form that lets you request permission to use a trademarked logo. All you have to do is submit your contact information, the name and address of the bakery, and the type of cake you want to order. A couple of days later, you’ll get back an electronic approval you can share with the bakery.

While you’re waiting for your approval, you can visit the BSA Brand Center for a selection of official logos, which the bakery might find useful as they design your cake.

When the Scouting Magazine blog talked about this process recently, a few commenters blamed the BSA’s lawyers for what they saw as an unwieldy process. I respectfully disagree. First, if the BSA doesn’t protect its trademarks, it could someday lose them. Second, filling out an online form and waiting a couple of days to order a cake doesn’t seem all that burdensome to me–especially if you’re planning ahead as I suggest in The Eagle Court of Honor Book.

To put it another way, your honoree has been working for years to reach Scouting’s highest rank. I think he can reasonably expect you to do the right thing as you prepare to honor him.


What? You don’t have a copy of The Eagle Court of Honor Book yet? Click the title to order one now in either print or Kindle format. When you do, I think you’ll agree with the reader who said, “The information is insightful and a welcome addition for our parents preparing for their sons’ ceremony. It is well organized and easy to follow. It flows like a river.”

Within My Power

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“A hundred years from now it will not matter what my bank account was, the sort of house I lived in, or the kind of car I drove. But the world may be different because I was important in the life of a boy.”

You’ve probably read some variation of those words before. But did you know they first appeared in Scouting magazine in 1950? They did, and they end a powerful essay by BSA administrator Forest E. Witcraft. Here it is in its entirety:

I am not a very important man, as importance is commonly rated. I do not have great wealth, control a big business, or occupy a position of great honor or authority.

Yet I may someday mold destiny. For it is within my power to become the most important man in the world in the life of a boy. And every boy is a potential atom bomb in human history.

A humble citizen like myself might have been the Scoutmaster of a troop in which an undersized unhappy Austrian lad by the name of Adolph might have found a joyous boyhood, full of the ideals of brotherhood, goodwill, and kindness. And the world would have been different.

A humble citizen like myself might have been the organizer of a Scout troop in which a Russian boy called Joe might have learned the lessons of democratic cooperation.

These men would never have known that they had averted world tragedy, yet actually they would have been among the most important men who ever lived.

All about me are boys. They are the makers of history, the builders of tomorrow. If I can have some part in guiding them up the trails of Scouting, on to the high road of noble character and constructive citizenship, I may prove to be the most important man in their lives, the most important man in my community.

A hundred years from now it will not matter what my bank account was, the sort of house I lived in, or the kind of car I drove. But the world may be different because I was important in the life of a boy.

These days, of course, Scouting serves girls as well as boys. These days, of course, the world is threatened by people with different names than Hitler and Stalin. Nonetheless, the truth of Witcraft’s words remain.

I recently interviewed a leading university president who became an Eagle Scout in 1960. He told me he loved Scouting but struggled with swimming and lifesaving. Fortunately, his Scoutmaster wouldn’t let him give up. Instead, the man gave him unlimited access to his motel’s pool and, probably more importantly, the encouragement to persevere and overcome the challenge he faced. And the world is different because one man was important in the life of one boy.

Too often in Scouting, we focus on numbers, thinking we’re only successful if we have lots of kids in our troops or produce lots of Eagle Scouts. But the most important number is really one. If you change the life of just one Scout this week, this month, or this year, you will be a very important person indeed.


Need more great troop program ideas? Check out The Scoutmaster’s Other Handbook, which is available in both print and e-book formats at https://www.eaglebook.com/products.htm#scoutmasters.