The Great Frame-up

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I’ve spent an impressive amount of money on picture-framing over the years. That’s partly because I have a lot of photos and other art in my house and partly because my daughter convinced me years ago that how you frame a picture is guaranteed to either enhance or detract from its appearance. Just as the punishment should fit the crime, the frame should fit its contents. That’s why art museums typically display great works of art in frames that look like works of art themselves.

Frames play an important role in Eagle courts of honor as well. One of the items typically presented to a new Eagle Scout is his official certificate–which will fortunately look a whole lot nicer than the one above that I received back in 1982! Hand the Scout his certificate without a frame, and it looks like little more than a floppy piece of paper. Stick it in a frame, however, and it begins to look worthy of the occasion.

You could spend a lot of money on a frame, but you really don’t have to. Discount stores typically offer basic styles for just a few dollars–there just a dollar at Dollar Tree–and the Scout could easily upgrade to something nicer later on. For example, ScoutStuff.org offers a very attractive shadow box frame with space for both the certificate and medal for about $60.

By the way, you could also purchase an 11×14 frame with a pre-cut 8×10 mat. That’s a quick and easy way to make the certificate more impressive. Whatever you do, just remember that the clothes make the man and the frame makes the certificate.


Speaking of certificates, check out my Eagle Mountain and Eagle Mentor certificates. These inexpensive gifts are a great way to honor your new Eagle Scout and the men and women who helped him reach the summit. And they’re now available in both full-color and classic parchment versions.

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2 thoughts on “The Great Frame-up

  1. Karen

    I purchased the Eagle Court Of Honor book on Amazon. Then when I was purchasing stuff at the Scout Store I noticed they have Grandparent pins. I do not see in the book how to put that into the ceremony. If you can please advise if you have a script for that. Thank you. Karen

    • Hi, Karen. First off, thanks for buying the book; I hope you find it helpful. Please note the link at the beginning of the chapter of complete ceremonies that allows you to download all the scripts in the book.

      As for your question, there’s not a lot to script there. What I like to do with mentor pins is have the Scout at the end of his personal statement call up the people he wants to recognize, tell why he chose them, and present them with their pins. With the grandparent pins, I would have him present those at the end of the presentation phase (after he’s received his badge and presented the mom and dad pins). The emcee could say something like this: “Johnny is fortunate to have two of his grandparents, Bob Smith and Jane Jones, here today to celebrate with them. At this time, would they could forward to receive grandparent pins.”

      By the way, he could also later present pins to grandparents who aren’t able to be at the ceremony.

      Hope this helps. Let me know if you have other questions. My contact info is in the book.

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