Removing Barriers at Eagle Courts of Honor

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Your courts of honor are undoubtedly open to all comers—but can everybody come? Is the facility where you’re holding the ceremony free of barriers that could keep out wheelchair users and others with permanent or temporary disabilities?

I thought about those questions when planning one of our troop’s Eagle courts of honor. The honoree’s grandfather used a wheelchair, and I needed to make sure he could get in and out of the building and have a place to sit during the ceremony. In our case, we only had to make one minor modification (holding the reception in a different room than usual), but you may need to make bigger adjustments—perhaps even choosing a different location for the court of honor.

In brief, you want to make sure there are no stairs to climb, that ramps have a slope of 1:12 or less, that hallways are at least 36 inches wide and that doorways are at least 32 inches wide. Also be sure that you have accessible restrooms and a designated parking area. (For much more information, see the Americans with Disabilities Act checklist at http://www.ada.gov/racheck.pdf.)


For more great ideas, check out my new ebook, Showtime: 45 Top Tips from EagleBook.com and The Eagle Court of Honor Book; it costs just $2.99 and is available for immediate download from both EagleBook.com and Amazon.com.

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